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Ant

Pavement Ants

Pavement ants are light brown to black with appendages lighter than the rest of the body.

They are about 2.5 to 3 mm long, with parallel lines on head and thorax. They have a 12-segmented antennae with a three-segmented club.

Carpenter Ants

They build nests inside wood consisting of galleries chewed out with their mandibles, preferably in dead, damp wood. They do not consume the wood, however, unlike termites.

Sometimes, carpenter ants hollow out sections of trees. They also commonly infest wooden buildings and structures, and are a widespread nuisance and major cause of structural damage. One of the most familiar species associated with human habitation in the United States is the black carpenter ant (Camponotus pennsylvanicus). The genus includes over 1,000 species.

Field Ants

Field ants are one of the most common ants seen outdoors, especially when they swarm in the fall to mate. Although they are harmless, the large numbers of winged ants emerging from their underground colony can be alarming — or just annoying, and warrant pest control.

Acrobat Ant

Acrobat ants get their common name from their ability to acrobatically raise their abdomen over their thorax and head, especially when disturbed. There are various species of this light brown to black ant found throughout the United States, even at altitudes of up to 8,000 feet.

Bed Bugs

How to get rid of this?

To get your pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

Oriental Cockroaches

Signs of an Oriental Cockroach Infestation

Sightings 

During the warmer months, it is not uncommon to find oriental roaches outside around landscaping beds, congregating beneath moist gutters, or even scurrying out from storm drains and sewer grates at night. Mostly active at night, they can be found during the day in areas and rooms that are kept primarily moist, dark and undisturbed.

Egg Capsules

Egg cases, or oothecas, of the oriental cockroach may appear dark brown or reddish in color and almost 8 to 10 mm in length. Each egg case, which can hold approximately 16 eggs, is dropped by the female into protected areas, almost 30 hours after it is produced.

Odor

In areas where large populations of oriental cockroaches are present, a musty odor can be detected. This odor is a result of chemicals that are secreted by the insects that are used to communicate within the population.

Oriental cockroach (Blatta orientalis) is also known as the waterbug, shade roach or black beetle. Oriental cockroaches are shiny, blackish-brown species that measure approximately 25 to 32 in length. The wings of adult male Oriental cockroaches cover two-thirds of the abdomen. Adult female specimens are wingless, and their small wing pads extend only to the middle of the abdomen. Oriental roaches do not fly.

Oriental cockroaches can be a source for many food-borne pathogens, including E.coli,Salmonella spp., and other pathogens. Due to their dietary preference for garbage and decaying organic matter, oriental cockroaches can carry these pathogens on their legs and bodies from contaminated areas and then transmit them onto clean surfaces.

German Cockroaches

The German cockroach (Blattella germanica) is a small species of cockroach, typically about 1.1 to 1.6 cm (0.43 to 0.63 in)long. In colour it varies from tan to almost black, and it has two dark, roughly parallel, streaks on the pronotum running anteroposteriorly from behind the head to the base of the wings. Although Blattella germanica has wings, it can

barely fly, although it may glide when disturbed. However, the Asian cockroach is attracted to light and can fly rather like a moth, while the German cockroach cannot.

Brown-Banded Cockroach

The brown-banded cockroach (Supella longipalpa) is a small species of cockroach, measuring about 5⁄8 in (10 to 14 mm) long. It is the only species of the genus Supella.[1] It  is tan to light brown and has two light-colored bands across the wings and abdomen, they may sometimes appear to be broken or irregular but are quite noticeable. The bands may be partly obscured by the wings. The male has wings that cover the abdomen, while the female has wings that do not cover the abdomen completely. The male appears more slender than the female, the female appears wider.

 American Cockroach

How to get rid of this?

 

To get your pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

Assess the situation

Your APC technician will do a thorough inspection of your home—inside and outside. There are several things the technician will do during the inspection:

  • Locate areas of American cockroach
  • Identify the causes of the American cockroach
  • Look for entryways that American cockroaches could be using to get into your home.
Implement a customized solution

Since “cookie-cutter” treatments aren’t always effective, the technician will customize the treatment to the situation. He can select from a variety of tools and techniques to help keep American cockroaches out of your home:

  • Exclusion–Non-Chemical methods such as caulking or door sweeps help keep American cockroaches from entering your
  • Landscape modification—If American roaches are living around your home, it may be necessary to remove dead leaves or rake mulch away from the foundation. The technician will point out these
  • Gel or granular bait—These are applied in areas where American cockroaches will eat them but children or pets cannot reach
  • Insect growth regulator—Applied into cockroach hiding places, these interfere with the cockroaches’ normal
  • Residual insecticides—Applied into cracks and crevices, these help keep American cockroaches from hiding in the treated areas. The technician may also apply liquid insecticide outdoors to help keep American cockroaches from coming inside.
Monitor 

Every time the technician returns to your home, he or she will make an inspection. There are several things he will do during the inspection:

  • Confirm that previous treatment was
  • Check for new American cockroach
  • Identify changes to the home or landscape that could make your home vulnerable to American cockroach

APC can provide the right solution to keep American cockroaches in their place … out of your home. For more information or to schedule an inspection, please contact your local APC branch office.

Convenient, Lasting and Affordable Treatment

Convenience

APC can work around your schedule. In many cases, treatments will be made on the outside—sometimes with no need for you to be at home.

On-Going Process

Keeping American cockroaches out of your home is an on-going collaborative process, not a one-time event. A.P.C’s solution is the ideal way to help keep these pests where they belong—outside your home.

House Flies Appearance

Usually gray, less than 4 to 7.5 mm long with four black stripes on the thorax.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

They prefer corners and edges or thin objects to rest on. Indoors, they rest on floors, walls and ceilings during the day. Outdoors, they will rest on plants, the ground, fence wires, garbage cans, etc. Night resting places are usually near sources of food and 5 to 15 feet off the ground.

Wide variety of food, including human food, animal food and carcasses, garbage and excrement.

Reproduction

House fly eggs are laid in almost any warm, moist material that will supply suitable food for the larvae. The female may lay a total of five to six batches of 75 to 100 eggs. In warm weather, eggs hatch in 12 to 24 hours.

Signs of a House Fly Infestation

 The adult flies are the most common sign of activity. Larvae also may be seen as they crawl out the breeding material to pupate. Lastly, the pupae themselves may sometimes be observed nearby the breeding material.

More Information

House Fly Facts

The average lifespan for a house fly in the wild is less than one month. Houseflies pass through the egg, larval and pupal stages in approximately 10 days, after which adult flies emerge. House flies cease growth after emerging from their pupae.

House flies are covered with small hairs that serve as taste organs. Their compound eyes are extremely complex: thousands of individual lenses allow them a wide field of vision.

House flies are major carriers of disease. They are known to transfer over 100 pathogens resulting in ailments, including typhoid, tuberculosis, cholera and dysentery. House flies

collect these pathogens on their legs and mouths when feeding on feces, trash and other decaying material.

House Fly Control 

House flies can be a real nuisance when they are flying around. But they can also transmit diseases, so it is important to get rid of them. House fly control is not always as easy as it sounds. There is often more involved than a fly swatter. House fly control involves several steps, and Aaron Pest Inspector can help.

The first step is identification. It is easy to confuse house flies with several other fly species, including cluster flies. The different types of flies may look similar, but they require different control methods. The Aaron Inspector can help with the identification.

It is very important to identify the places where the flies have been depositing their eggs. It may be something simple like an uncovered trash can or a bowl of pet food on the patio. However the house fly breeding site could be something that is not obvious. The breeding site must be cleaned up or removed. If the breeding site is not removed, the flies will continue to be a problem.

Fruit Flies Appearance

Drosophila melanogaster is a species of small fly. Adults are 3 to 4 mm long, may have red eyes, though some are dark eyed, and a tan thorax. The abdomen is black on top, gray underneath. Fruit flies can appear to be brown or tan in color.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Populations tend to build during the summer, becoming very abundant at harvest time.

Indoors, fruit flies are frequently active at all times of the year.

Fruit flies eat ripened fruit and vegetables and fermentation products. Ream more about fruit flies in food.

Reproduction

Larvae of fruit flies develop in moist areas where organic material and standing water are present. The entire life cycle lasts 25 days or more depending on the environmental conditions and the availability of food.

Signs of a Fruit Fly Infestation

The two most visible signs of fruit fly activity would be the adult flies and the pupae. Adult flies often are seen flying around in kitchens or trash cans near the decaying fruit or vegetables. They also are attracted to liquor and liquor/beer bottles. The mature larvae of fruit flies crawl out of the breeding material to pupate in a dry nearby spot. They sometimes are mistaken for cockroach or rodent droppings but can easily be differentiated by a pair of horns on one end of the pupae.

Gnats

Gnats typically are small and long-legged insects. They often are weak fliers.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Gnat is the common name for many small, winged insects in the fly grouping. Contrary to popular belief, these tiny flying insects are not “babies,” they are adults. The tiny flying insects that many people call “gnats” could really be fruit flies or fungus gnats. Depending on species, gnats can be biting or non biting and will feed on plants, other insects or blood.

Reproduction

For some species, males assemble in large mating swarms known as ghosts. These swarms occur most commonly at dusk in large fields and above streets. Depending on the species, gnat eggs are laid on land or water. Larvae may be immobile or capable of movement by way of rocks and water plants. Adults range in size but usually are no larger than 33 mm. The larval and adult stages of the gnat are considered both beneficial and detrimental. Some species are excellent plant pollinators and feed on crop pests such as aphids and scales. Other gnats, such as the Hessian fly, are crop pests themselves.

Females of some species, such as the black gnat or black fly, feed on blood. These gnats have been known to carry parasites and spread diseases to humans and livestock. Due to the spread of river blindness and other health concerns, numerous programs have been established throughout the world to control gnat populations.

Signs of a Gnat Infestation

The main sign of gnats are the sightings of the adults as they fly about in the air.

More Information Gnat Control

The best control for fungus gnats is to identify any plants that have wet soil and let that soil dry completely before the next watering. This will kill the larval stages in the soil. The adult gnats can be removed with a vacuum cleaner from windows and from around the plants.

For most gnat populations, their food source must be located and corrected if possible. Fruit should not be exposed to open air. Keeping fruit in the refrigerator protects it from gnats and also prolongs the fruit’s period of ripeness. Watering plants only when they need water will help prevent fungus gnat infestations. Schedule a pest control inspection if you are encountering difficulty ridding your home of these pests.

Some Other Ways to Get Rid of Gnats

Most traditionally, people use fly swatters to kill individual insects. However, the most effective methods require positive identification of insects, which is best conducted with the

assistance of a pest control professional. Pesticides require careful application, as they can prove harmful to humans and pets if misapplied.

Electric fly exploders that electrocute individual gnats may help to control their populations outside but also kill many beneficial insects. Inside, insect traps that are plugged into electrical outlets work by emitting ultraviolet light sources. Flying insects are attracted to this light and are caught by the sticky surface of the trap when they approach.

Most of these methods address only individual, adult specimens. In order to properly treat an entire gnat infestation, including larvae, it is best to consult a pest control professional.

Blow Flies

Facts, Identification & Control

Latin Name

Family Calliphoridae

Appearance

Blow flies are often metallic in appearance, with feathery hairs on the terminal antennal segments of the males. Adult blow flies have sponge-like mouth parts, while maggots have hook-like mouth parts.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Blow flies belong to the Family Calliphoridae of flies under the Order Diptera. To date, there are approximately 80 species of blow flies in North America.

Blow flies are attracted to decaying meat and are typically the first organisms to come into contact with dead animals. The meat of dead animals is essential for larval survival and growth. They are also attracted to plants that give off the smell of rotting meat and as such, can be a pollinator for those plants.

Hornets

Hornets are insects, the largest eusocial wasps.There are different types of controls to get rid of hornets.

Practical Non-Chemical Hornet Control,Natural Hornet Control,Hornet Nest Removal,Hornet Nest Removal,Get Professional Help for Hornets Nest Removal.Keeping garbage cans sealed, clean, and taking garbage out regularly should help get rid of hornets. Vinegar apparently makes a good bait for water traps designed to capture and get rid of hornets.

How to get rid of this?

To get your pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

This hornet (also called Giant hornet) gets its common name from its introduction from Europe into the New York area in the 1800’s. European hornets are much larger than yellow jackets and unlike most stinging insects, can be active at night.

Looking to get rid of hornets? Change exterior lights to yellow bulbs to reduce this pests’ attraction to your home or property. Promptly remove any fallen fruit from trees, as it attracts these hornets. If you suspect you have a hornet infestation or find a nest on your home or property, contact us immediately. Avoid hornet stings; do not attempt to remove a nest on your own.

Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are small flying insects, and they are experts in finding people and biting them

and infect millions of people all over the world.

Mosquitoes cause many diseases like malaria, dengue, yellow fever etc. Mosquitoes cause viral diseases and they can transmit diseases from one person to another. Due to this, over one million people worldwide die from mosquito-borne diseases every year.

To get rid of this problem, our team will prevent this by taking some effective treatments with least impact on the environment.

How to get rid of this?

To get your pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

Mosquito treatment is usually an integrated effort involving source reduction plus the use of chemical control products when needed. Since mosquitoes develop in water, source reduction targets and eliminates water sources favorable for mosquito breeding. While source reduction is the more effective long-term approach to mosquito treatment, the

mosquito treatment plan may require using chemical products to supplement source reduction.

The mosquito treatment plan begins with your pest management professional conducting a thorough property inspection and identifying the kind of mosquitoes causing problems.

Once the inspection and identification is complete, your pest management professional will prepare a mosquito treatment plan that provides recommendations and assistance for both source reduction and necessary chemical product use. Some of the source reduction recommendations might include:

  • Preparing a diagram of your property that shows the actual or potential mosquito development sites. Mosquito develop sites are normally identified as a natural or man-made site that will collect Some examples are low areas on the property that are prone to collecting water after rain, clogged rain gutters, flooded crawl spaces, water that pools around downspouts, water that collects in cans, child swimming pools, uncovered boats, tree holes or rubbish and debris that hold water.
  • Providing recommendations to exclude mosquitoes from getting inside the
  • Providing recommendations for vegetation management. This is important since many kinds of mosquitoes rest in vegetation around the home during the daylight hours.

Some chemical product uses that may be needed for mosquito treatment include:

  • Applying insecticides to vegetation that adult mosquitoes use for sheltered resting sites.
  • Applying insect growth regulators that prevent mosquito development in their water
  • Applying microbial insecticide products that cause mosquito mortality in their water

Roof Rat

Appearance

Black or brown, can be over 40 cm long, with a long tail, large ears and eyes, and a pointed nose. Body is smaller and sleeker than the Norway rat’s. Fur is smooth.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Nests inside and under buildings, or in piles of rubbish or wood. Excellent climber that can often be found in the upper parts of structures. Roof rats are highly adaptable. They prefer to live in high places, but may live in a variety of environments. They are nocturnal by nature and are accomplished climbers. As their name suggests, roof rats may be found in elevated areas such as trees, rafters, attics and roofs. Roof rats can also nest on the ground if necessary.

In dense populations, roof rats will establish a social hierarchy, wherein dominant males mate more than subordinate males.

House Mice

Appearance

House mice are covered in short hair that is light brown or gray to black in color, with lighter bellies. Their ears and tail also bear hair, although much less than their bodies. Adult mice weigh approximately 12 to 30 grams and can grow up to 20 cm from the nose to the tip of the tail. Droppings are rod-shaped and pointed on both ends.

To prevent mice from entering the home, all cracks, crevices, holes and gaps larger than a pen cap should be sealed with cement or a mixing compound. It is not advised that wood be used to seal these holes, as mice are capable of chewing through those surfaces.

Cleanliness may also have an effect on pest infestations. Be sure to wash dishes immediately following use. Food should be stored in glass or metal containers with tight lids. Mice acquire most of their water from scavenged food particles and no crumbs or morsels should be left on tabletops or floors.

When a home is already infested, prevention methods prove inefficient. The most effective mouse control methods are those administered by A.P.C.

Deer Mice

Appearance

Round and slender, ranging from 7 to 10 cm long in body length with a pointed nose and large, black beady eyes. Ears are large with little fur covering them. Body is bicolored with a light brownish-reddish top and white underbelly and feet. Tail is short, distinctly bicolored (dark on top and light on bottom), and covered with short, fine hairs and can be 5 to 13 cm in length.

Deer mice may appear harmless, but they are known carriers of dangerous diseases such as hantavirus. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome can develop from inhaling the virus when deer mouse urine or feces is disturbed. Utmost care should be employed when disposing of deer mouse droppings. A OSHA-approved respirator with a functioning cartridge should be worn. The droppings and urine should be sprayed with disinfectant before sweeping them up.

Cotton Rats
Appearance

The head and body of cotton rats range in length from 13.3 to 21.3 cm. The tail is bare and is not as long as the head and body (7.6 to 16.5 cm). Their bodies are covered with coarse hair. The ears are almost hidden by the hair. The rats are usually gray on their back with black hairs mixed in. The underside is light colored.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

This rat is widespread across much of the country. Its range is from Florida to California and north to Virginia and Kansas. There have been reports of this rat as far north as Illinois.

Cotton rats are agricultural pests. They live in grassy areas and feed on plants. In some areas they have caused considerable damage to row crops. Cotton rats nest on the ground or in shallow burrows. They make trails in the grass where they travel.

Cotton rats move readily from fields into lawns and gardens, especially in suburban and rural areas. Although cotton rats are not usually structural pests, they can invade buildings, especially if they find food available. Cotton rats can easily infest garages, barns, storage

sheds and similar structures. Lake homes and hunting cabins that are seldom used are also possible places for these rats to invade.

Reproduction

These rats are very prolific. The female rat can produce as many as nine litters per year, with six young per litter. The young are mature in about a month. When there is plenty of food, these rats can reproduce at an amazing rate. When food is scarce, their reproductive rate is lower.

Signs of a Cotton Rat Infestation

Signs of cotton rat activity can include sightings of the rodent or shallow burrows with multiple entrances.

Seward Rat
Rodent Facts

Rodents’ biology and habits can make them challenging to control, and they present a serious menace to your home. If you’re in need of rodent control services, here’s what you should know about these pests:

Rats

Instincts: Rats are instinctively wary of things new to their environment, including rat control measures such as traps and bait, and colonize in attics, burrows, under concrete and porches, in wall voids and other hard-to-reach places.

Disease: Rats can harbor and transmit a number of serious diseases. They can also introduce disease-carrying parasites such as fleas and ticks into your home.

Mice

Access: They invade your home seeking food, water and warmth.

Contamination: Each mouse can contaminate much more food than it eats.

Rodent Family

The Order Rodentia comprises over 2,000 species, which are subdivided into many families. The Capromyidae, Castoridae, Cricetidae, Erethizontidae, Muridae, Sciuridae and Dipodidae are some of the most common families. The Family Muridae is the largest, containing nearly two-thirds of all rodent species. This family includes several subfamilies and includes sand rats, gerbils, crested rats and old world rats and mice.

Stinging Pest 

Yellow jackets, genera Dolichovespula and Vespula, get their name from their yellow and black bodies. They measure 10 to 16 mm in length. Most yellow jackets are black and yellow, although some may exhibit white and black coloration. In contrast to the bee, the yellow jacket’s waist is thinner and defined. Their elongated wings are as long as the body and fold laterally when at rest.

Yellow jackets are wasps that can be identified by their alternating black and yellow body segments and small size. They are often mistaken for bees, although their bodies lack the same amount of hair, rounded abdomen, and the expanded hind leg used for carrying pollen of the bee. These social wasps live in colonies that may contain thousands of insects at a time.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

 Yellow jackets are pollinators and may also be considered beneficial because they eat beetle grubs, flies and other harmful pests. However, they are also known scavengers who

eat meat, fish and sugary substances, making them a nuisance near trash receptacles and picnics.

Many yellow jackets are ground-nesters. Their colonies can be found under porches or steps, in sidewalk cracks, around railroad ties or at the base of trees. Sometimes the queen uses a wall void of a building as a nesting place. Some yellow jackets build aerial nests in bushes or low-hanging branches or in the corners of buildings and other manmade structures.

Reproduction

 A queen yellow jacket starts a new nest by building a small paper nest in which she lays the first batch of eggs. After hatching, these eggs are fed by the queen until they are ready to pupate and mature into adult yellow jackets. Adults live through one season and feed on caterpillars, grubs and other insects. They also enjoy nectar and sweet substances such as fruit and tree sap. Yellow jackets are attracted to garbage and other human foods, particularly meats and sweets.

A colony may contain 1,000 or more workers by fall. All of the workers are sterile females. In late summer males will begin to appear. When they become adults, they will mate with the females that will become the next year’s queens. The fertilized females will hibernate through the winter. The workers and the males will perish when the weather turns cold.

Signs of a Yellow Jacket Infestation

Yellow jackets usually are detected when workers are encountered. Nests, particularly the aerial nests, also may be a sign.

How we treat those pest

Since yellow jackets are beneficial predators of many damaging insects, treatment should only be applied when yellow jackets pose a stinging threat to people or pets. Therefore, a yellow jacket treatment program begins with a thorough inspection and correct identification from your pest management professional. This is important since yellow jackets usually build their nests below ground, but they may also build them in hidden, protected locations above ground. Once the nest is located, your pest management professional can use the most effective control products and methods to help eliminate control of the yellow jackets within the nest.

Wasps

Varies tremendously depending on species. Most have two pair of wings and a pinched waist. They range in colors from black to metallic greens and blues and vary in size from almost microscopic to several centimeters long.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Wasp species are categorized as social or solitary. As their name implies, social wasps live in colonies, which may number in the thousands. Within these colonies, female workers perform all duties within the nest. Solitary wasps live alone and therefore do not have a colony. They do lay eggs, but their eggs are left alone to hatch.

Some wasps are predatory, while others are parasitic. Predatory wasps kill and consume other insects as well as other animals which they often feed to their larvae. Parasitic wasps typically lay their eggs in the bodies of living creatures like caterpillars or spiders. The larvae feed on the still-living host. Wasps can assist in the management of other pests, particularly in agriculture as biological control agents. Many wasps also feed on nectar from flowers and therefore function as pollinators.

Some wasps are aggressive species and can sting when threatened. Unlike honey bees, wasps often are capable of stinging multiple times.

Reproduction

Late in the summer, the queen of some species will produce unfertilized eggs. These will develop into males. The males will fertilize the wasps that will become the queens of the following year. These fertilized females will overwinter in a sheltered location. In most cases, the rest of the colony will perish when winter comes. Next spring, the queen will start laying eggs. The fertilized eggs that they produce will become workers, building the nest and feeding the larvae produced by the queen.

Scorpions

Scorpions are arachnids that possess eight legs. They are related to spiders, mites and ticks, as well as other members of the Arachnida class.

The scorpion’s anatomy is composed of two segments called the cephalothorax—also known as the abdomen/opisthosoma. It is composed of an extended body and a segmented, erectile tail, which ends with the stinger. A hard, bony outer covering known as

the carapace protects the cephalothorax. This covering supports a pair of median eyes at the top center.

Anatomy

The cephalothorax is made up of the head, including the carapace, the eyes, chelicerae or the mouth, the pedipalps or the claws, and four pairs of walking legs. These claws are one of the most significant parts of the scorpion, since they are used to seize prey and defend against predators.

The opisthosoma, or the abdomen, is split into two parts, namely the mesosoma and the metasoma. The mesosoma has seven parts whereas the metasoma has five.

The mesosoma, which is the abdomen’s front half, is made up of six segments. The first are the sexual organs, including a pair of vestigial and modified appendages that form a structure called the genital operculum. The second is the featherlike sensory organ called the pectines. The last four segments contain each pair of lungs. All in all, the mesosoma is shielded with tergites, a chitinous plate on the upper surface, with the sternites on the lower surface.

The other half of the abdomen, which is the metasoma, includes the tail. The tail has six segments, the last of which contains the anus and the stinger. The telson has a vesicle, which in turn has a pair of venom glands and the hypodermic aculeus, or the barb. Some scorpions are born with two tails, which is considered a genetic abnormality.

The cuticle is the tough armor that surrounds the scorpion’s body. It is covered with hairs that work as balancing organs.

Bees

What Do Bees Look Like?

Found globally, bees are winged insects of the order Hymenoptera, superfamily Apoidea. There are more than 20,000 recorded bee species. Megachile pluto, the largest of these creatures, is reported to be 3.9 cm long, while Perdita minima, the most diminutive of bees, are shorter than 2 mm long. Bees can be black or brown with red, yellow or lustrous blue stripes.

Behavior, Diet & Habits 

While some bees are solitary, species such as honey bees and bumblebees are tremendously social. Bee colonies are composed of three castes: the queen bee, infertile female worker bees and male drones. The queen mates and lays eggs for the span of her life. Honey bee queens can live up to five years, though most average a lifespan of two to three years. Male drones exist solely to fertilize the queen and die soon after having fulfilled their task. Female worker bees perform a multitude of tasks necessary to the survival of the hive. As a result of their constant laboring, their average life span is usually a mere six weeks.

Reproduction

All bees are hairy, a crucial trait for pollen collection. Flowers and flourishing vegetation often attract bees, and there is no insect as important as the bee when it comes to pollination. Many female bee species have rows of bristles on their hind legs which form a hollow basket. When the bee lands on a flower, pollen grains are combed into the hollow basket and bristles. Cross-pollination occurs when the displaced grains of pollen are distributed to the fertile pistils of other flowers as the bee alights upon them. Although only females are able to transfer pollen, all bees are able to sip the nectar from flowers using a tonguelike organ. This nectar is their primary source of energy. Pollen is sustenance for both adult and larval bees, as it contains protein and other nutrients necessary to their survival. Bees possess an organ that converts nectar into honey, which is collected, depending on the species, inside the hive or bee colony.

Carpenter Bees

SIGNS OF A CARPENTER BEE INFESTATION

Carpenter bee infestations are easily identified by the presence of their entrance holes in wood, the presence of sawdust on the ground under where the hole is drilled, the presence of a yellowish combination of pollen and bee excrement near the entrance hole and their bothersome flight activity, especially by the males who are protective of their territory, but do not sting.

Bee Swarms

The most well-documented and encountered bee swarms are those of honey bees.

Typically, honey bee swarms are not a major threat, unless when dealing with Africanized honey bees. The bees do not have a nest or young and, therefore, are less defensive.

However, they will sting if provoked.

Bee swarming typically occurs in colonies that are thriving and with robust populations.

Weak colonies of bees may not swarm until they become stronger and larger in population.

Bee colonies may become weak due to starvation, disease or failing queens. Several factors can contribute to the occurrence of a swarm, such as seasonal changes and overcrowding.

Control

While bees can benefit the environment in many ways, it is inconvenient and possibly dangerous to let a bee hive thrive near your home.

Formosan termites

Appearance

Formosan termites prefer warm climates and densely populated certain areas of the American South. Also known as an introduced subterranean termite, the Formosan termite is found in states across the southern U.S., including Alabama, Florida, California, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, North Carolina, Texas and Tennessee.

However, they have also been located in smaller populations as far north as the Canadian border.

Formosan termites are social insects with three distinct forms (castes): the wingless or winged reproductives (alates), the protector soldiers and the workers. Since Formosan termite workers look very much like workers of other termite groups, the soldiers and winged alates are the castes that are useful to provide a correct identification. Since differentiation between Formosan termites and other termite groups is not easy, it is best to contact your pest management professional for help with providing an accurate identification.

Drywood Termites

Appearance

There are three distinct groups into which termites are divided: subterranean, drywood, and dampwood. Since the worker termites in these groups more or less look the same, the appearance of the reproductive caste (alates) and soldiers is important.

Habit 

Create colonies in wood, with no connection to the ground necessary; often found in attic wood; need very little moisture.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

 Wood and occasionally other cellulose material.

Reproduction

Nymphs pass through four to seven instars before reaching adulthood; sexual forms eventually swarm to form new colonies.

Signs of a Drywood Termite Infestation Swarms

When a drywood termite colony is mature, swarms of winged male and female reproductive insects are produced. These reproductive termites fly out of their colony to create new colonies after mating. Warm temperatures and heavy rains instigate swarms.

Frass

Drywood termites extract as much water as possible from the feces to conserve it. The results are very distinct fecal pellets called frass. They are a hexagonal and all are a similar size of 1 mm long. The termites kick them out of their tunnel. Appearance of mounds of these pellets indicate activity. It is important to note that pellets can remain almost indefinitely from a dead colony and may mislead a homeowner that it is current activity.

Contact a termite control professional to confirm current activity.

Dampwood Termites

Appearance

There are several species of dampwood termites in the United States. Dampwood termites are much larger then the subterranean termites that are common across the country. The swarmers (winged termites) can be 25 mm long, including their wings. The soldiers can be as large as 20 mm. They have a large head with mandibles (pincers) on the front. There are no dampwood termite workers. The immature termites do the work in the colony. The immature termites can be as much as 20 mm long.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Dampwood termites get their name from the damp, sometimes decaying, wood that they use to locate their colonies. Dampwood termites do not typically nest in the soil. They will invade wood that is on the ground, especially if it is decaying. Dampwood termites are common along the Pacific coast. They are considered an economic pest. There are also dampwood termites in the Southwest desert and in southern Florida.

Reproduction

A pair of winged swarmers starts a colony of dampwood termites. They find a suitable piece of wood and make a chamber in it. They produce a few eggs the first year. Colonies are usually small, but in ideal conditions dampwood termite colonies can become large.

Signs of Dampwood Termite Infestation Damage

Dampwood termites do not usually have contact with the soil. They do not make tunnels like the subterranean termites. Wood that dampwood termites have damaged usually looks clean and smooth inside. They often eat across the grain, especially in wood that is decayed.

Frass

The dampwood termites sometimes use their fecal pellets to seal the galleries where they live from the outside air. If the wood is fairly dry, the fecal pellets may fall to the bottom of the gallery. If the wood is very damp, the fecal pellets may stick to the sides of the termite galleries.

Termites

Termites are a group of Eusocial Insects that live in colonies.

Termites are the most dangerous insects than any other insects living in the world. These termites can destroy your house foundations, furniture, shelves etc.,

Therefore, it is necessary to take the proper steps to protect your homes from termites and get rid of them. Our team will prevent this by taking some effective treatments with least impact on the environment.

How to get rid of this?

To get your pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

A subterranean termite infestation begins when warm temperatures and heavy rainfall trigger an established colony to send out a swarm of winged termites. Swarms consist of winged reproductive males and females. Subterranean termite colonies are usually active for three to five years before winged reproductives appear. Winged, reproductive termites are frequently mistaken for flying ants, but are smaller than ants and have straight, rather than bent, antennae. Termite swarmers have four wings that are all the same size. Ant swarmers have two large wings in front and two smaller wings behind. After mating,

swarmer termites land and shed their wings, leaving them in piles that resemble fish scales. If there are piles of wings on windowsills of your home, check to see if they are all the same size. They could be termite wings especially if they are all the same size.

Lone Star TicksHabitat

Range & Distribution

Found across the U.S., the lone star tick is primarily distributed throughout the eastern, southeastern, and midwestern portions of the country. Also, the tick is reportedly found in other areas and is known to be expanding its range both northward and westward.

Amblyomma americanum frequently is located in second-growth woodland habitats, especially where the white-tail deer populations are plentiful.

Diet

Lone star ticks are three-host ticks, meaning they take a blood meal from different hosts when in their larval, nymphal and adult stages. After feeding once in each stage, the tick falls to the ground and molts or a fertile adult female lays eggs.

Life Cycle

The life cycle for a lone star tick begins after a female tick consumes a blood meal and drops off its host. After a few days, the female lays over 5,000 eggs in a protected area with high humidity, like under leaf litter. Such a habitat best enables the eggs to survive. Eggs will hatch into six-legged larvae and soon begin searching for a host. Lone star tick larvae exhibit a behavior known as questing and climb on an object or plant and wait for a host to pass by. After securing a host, the larva attaches; blood-feeds for about 1-3 days; drops off the host and soon molts into an eight-legged nymph. The nymphs repeat the questing procedure used by the larvae, except after dropping from their host, nymphs molt into adult ticks.

Hosts commonly infected by lone star ticks are humans, domesticated animals such as cattle, dogs and horses, ground-dwelling birds, squirrels, opossums and raccoons, plus white-tailed deer and coyotes. Primarily active in May and June, the lone star tick can become active on warm days during the winter and early spring.

Brown Dog Ticks

Appearance

Adult brown dog ticks are reddish-brown and lack any easily noticeable markings that are found on many other tick species. Adults that have not taken a blood meal are about

1/8-inch long. Blood-fed females are about a ½-inch long and have a blue-gray coloration.

Males are smaller than females, but are colored very similarly.

Life Cycle 

The brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineuls) is unique in its ability to complete the entire life cycle indoors. The brown dog tick is the species that is most often found in homes. As a result, brown dog tick populations can be found throughout the world, including areas with frigidly cold outdoor temperatures.

The life cycle of the brown dog tick is similar to that of other tick species in the family Ixodidae: beginning as eggs, they develop through larval and nymphal stages prior to maturing into adults. Brown dog ticks are three-host ticks, meaning that they drop off the host after the meal before each of their developmental stages. However, if necessary, a brown dog tick can remain with one host throughout its life. Unlike tick species that require

plants or soil for egg laying, female brown dog ticks are capable of laying thousands of eggs on any surface available to them.

Prevention

In homes, all areas frequented by house pets should be kept clean.

Brown dog ticks are often mistaken for deer ticks, which are known carriers of Lyme disease. However, brown dog ticks instead transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever. If there are medical concerns regarding a tick bite, consult a medical professional.

If a homeowner suspects a problem with brown dog ticks, the best thing to do is seek the advice and assistance of your pest management professional. Your pest management professional will provide a thorough inspection and prepare an integrated control plan based upon the findings. In general, an effective and efficient brown dog tick control plan includes:

  • Using veterinarian-recommended tick treatment products on

Frequently inspecting dogs or other pets and promptly eliminating any ticks that are found.

Using approved tick control products to target ticks that are either inside or outside the home.

Frequently cleaning and vacuuming the home’s interior to remove as many ticks as possible.

Deer Tick

Also Known as Black Legged Ticks

Deer ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are also known as blacklegged ticks. These ticks are often mistaken for brown dog ticks. Named for their propensity to feed on white-tailed deer, these ticks may also feed on other large mammals as hosts, including humans. Humans, considered accidental hosts of deer ticks, may contract Lyme disease from bites. Livestock and domestic animals can also be hosts. They are primarily found in the eastern half of the U.S.

Identification/Appearance

What do deer ticks look like?

Deer ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are also known as blacklegged ticks. These ticks are often mistaken for brown dog ticks. Deer ticks are common to the eastern United States and earn their name for commonly feeding on white-tailed deer. The pests use other large mammals, like pets, livestock, and humans, as hosts, as well. Though considered accidental hosts for ticks, humans may contract Lyme.

Bites 

Deer tick bites are virtually painless, and victims often do not recognize that they have been bitten until symptoms appear. Campers and hikers should always check themselves thoroughly. Deer tick females feed for extended periods and can be found attached to the skin of bite victims. If there are medical concerns, consult a physician. Read more about deer tick bites.

Lyme disease

Lyme disease is a debilitating disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. Deer ticks are the most common vectors of this bacterium. Lyme disease is easily transmitted to human and animal hosts through the deer tick’s bite.

Removal

Removal of deer ticks can be difficult. If a specimen is crushed, infected bodily fluids are released and may further contaminate a bite victim. Contact a physician for any medical concerns.

Ticks        

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Often found near wooded and highly vegetated areas. Some species require moisture to survive. Females and males of most species feed on the blood of mammals, birds and reptiles. Each tick species does have a preferred host, although most ticks will feed on whatever blood is available to them. Thus, ticks are known to bite livestock, deer, humans, dogs and cats.

Signs of a Ticks / Tick Infestation 

Tick signs usually are the ticks themselves. Secondary signs can include medical symptoms from diseases or fluids transmitted by ticks. These can vary and are best left to a medical professional for diagnosis.

Prevention / Control

Ticks also seek safety in hidden locations within homes. Repairing any crevices or gaps and keeping grass cut short outside may discourage infestations. The disposal of all empty bird and rodent nesting materials is also necessary, as ticks will readily infest these items.

Treatment for ticks is not the same as for fleas. If you suspect a tick infestation, call your local Aarons Pest Control.

Snakes

Appearance

Varies greatly depending on species. Overall, they lack fully developed legs and eyelids. They range from around 10 cm to several meters in length. Colors can be vivid greens, reds or yellows to darker black or brown. Many snakes have distinct stripes or patterning.

Though many people fear them, snakes are a very important part of our ecosystem. They help control pest populations for a variety of animals. Many snakes found in the United States are non-venomous and pose no risk to humans other than fright or a potential secondary infection in a bite. Despite this, many people have a deep-seated fear of snakes and don’t want any around their homes.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Snakes have several different ways to kill prey. Snakes eat such animals as frogs, salamanders, insects, worms, small rodents and birds. Venomous snakes have sharp,

hollow fangs designed to pierce skin and inject venom. They are located in the upper jaw with venom glands connected above. When not in use, the fangs fold back onto the mouth. Non-Venomous snakes use constriction to subdue their prey. They bite the prey and quickly wrap themselves around it. The snake applies pressure until the prey usually suffocates.

Regardless of the method of capture, the prey is consumed whole. The lower jaw is hinged and can open to surprising sizes, allowing the snake to consume prey larger than their mouth would otherwise accommodate.

Snakes are cold-blooded animals, which is why they sun in the warmer months and go into hibernation during the colder. To help keep body temperatures from dropping too low, sometimes snakes will even hibernate in dens together, thus sharing the limited heat available.

Reproduction

Snakes often mate in the spring. Some species lay eggs, while others give birth to live young. Number of offspring varies by species.

Signs of a Snake Infestation

Non-Venomous snakes vs. Venomous Snakes

All snakes should be treated with respect and left alone regardless of venom. Most venomous species in the U.S. are a type of pit viper, including copperheads and rattlesnakes. There are various ways to identify a pit viper from nonvenomous snakes. The physical differences focus on features of the head. Characteristics of the nonvenomous snake are narrow head, no pit between eye and nostril and round pupils. The pit vipers have a triangular shaped head, a prominent pit between eye and nostril and elliptical pupils.

There are also tail differences. Of course, close examination of a snake of unknown type can be dangerous. Contact a professional wildlife management technician for positive identification.

Copperhead Snakes

Copperhead snakes are some of the more commonly seen North American snakes. They’re also the most likely to bite, although their venom is relatively mild, and their bites are rarely fatal for humans.

Garden Snakes

The Garden snake is one of the most common snakes in North America. There are many varieties and subspecies, but all are thin with a long stripe along the spine, in the middle and usually a stripe along the side, running the length of the body as well. Many people have dubbed the Garden snakes the ‘garden snake’, as it’s so often found in suburban gardens. This species of snake are usually around 2 to 3 feet long but, on occasion, have been found to grow as large as 4 feet. The Garden snake has a similar biology to the

majority of other snakes found in North America. The color of a Garden is usually very dark and earthy – with tan or even red or yellow or green stripes down the middle of its body.

Water Snakes

Water snakes are non-venomous snakes found in North America that, true to their name, like to spend time in or around water. Water snakes are often confused with water moccasin snakes (also called cottonmouths), which are venomous with a dangerous bite. Inability to tell the two species apart has led to the death of many harmless water snakes.

Raccoons

Appearance

Procyon lotor is more commonly known as the raccoon. They are 61 to 91 cm long and have a distinctive black mask with a ringed tail.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

The raccoon’s nocturnal exploits have earned it a place throughout American culture. They are best known for their curious and mischievous nature, especially when it comes to trash cans.

Many home and business owners are forced into protective measures so their refuse isn’t scattered on a nightly basis. In fact, such actions earned the raccoon movie roles like the one in The Great Outdoors. It’s hard to believe that such a pest has earned both our ire and affection.

Typically, raccoons prefer to inhabit hollow trees and logs near lakes and streams. They are known to venture into populated areas, becoming a nuisance as they search for refuge and

forage for food. Raccoons will also use existing structures to construct a den. Some of their favorite habitats are the areas beneath porches and outbuildings, attics and chimneys.

During the months of spring and early summer, diet consists primarily of insects, frogs, fish and crayfish. They are known to roll back sod in search of earthworms and grubs (doing significant damage to lawns). During late summer and fall, raccoons move to nuts, grains, berries, fruits and sweet corn from gardens. Whether local residents or simply foraging, easily observable signs of raccoon activity are damaged lawns and raided garbage cans.

What do raccoons eat?

Raccoons are omnivores and will eat both plants and animals. Some of their common plant-based food sources include seeds, fruits, berries, acorns, nuts, and grains such as corn. Raccoons frequently eat animals like crawfish, fish, clams, snails, insects, frogs, and mice, as well. Raccoons also consume chicken and other kinds of bird eggs. Another common source of food for raccoons is waste generated by humans. Raccoons are frequently cited eating out of homeowner garbage cans. The mammal also prefers to consume uneaten pet foods left outside.

Reproduction

Raccoons are very social animals within their family groups. They mate from February to March, and females carry the young for approximately 60 days. A standard litter produces three to five young. At about 2 months of age, the young raccoons will begin accompanying their mother on outings to find food. The family group usually stays together for about one year. Upon maturation, an adult raccoon will vary in size from 61 to 91 cm in length and 4.5 to 13.5 kg.

Signs of a Raccoon Infestation

Raccoons are their own sign. The others signs can be their feeding damage, such as overturned trash cans or partially eaten garden items, such as corn or melons. Another sign can be the structural damage they may cause as they try to enter buildings, such as into attics.

Birds

Birds:  Facts, Identification & Control

Bird-related problems can lead to lost business, contaminated products and expensive damage to building exteriors. Some bird species harbor diseases that can be transmitted to humans and are classified as public health threats. Bird droppings are also problematic, as bird waste can ruin building finishes and create unsanitary conditions. The droppings can also be expensive to clean up. If birds become a problem, contact your pest management professional and ask him or her to develop a bird control program specifically tailored for your home or business.

Bird Control

Habitat modification usually is the best long-term solution to bird control. Reducing food availability and access to protective shelter for roosting and nesting are the fundamental objectives of any bird control program. Bird control efforts begin with a comprehensive inspection by your pest management professional and, based on the inspection findings, he or she will identify the species of bird(s) and choose the most effective exclusion methods.

Some common methods of bird exclusion include installing exclusion devices on surfaces used by birds for roosting and loafing, plus using bird screening to prevent access to bird roosting and nesting sites. Your pest management professional will employ techniques and products that are humane, efficient and effective to the target birds.

Bats

Appearance

Bats range in size across the different species, but tend to average about 5.5 to 19 cm in length (tip to tail) with a wingspread of approximately 15 to 38 cm. Most weigh between 3.5 and 60 grams (in the U.S.). Bats’ bodies are covered with hair varying in color from tan to black. Their wings stretch across elongated arm and finger bones.

Most bats have pointed ears and have the characteristic wings made of leathery skin; there is no fur on the wings. Bats also have teeth. When roosting, bats commonly hold on to their roost with their hind legs, hanging upside down. They cannot grasp with their front legs as the toes, known as fingers, are the support of the wing.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Most bats are insectivores, feeding on insects at night. Bats will also frequent outside lighting where insects will be flying in warmer weather. They may also be found near

swimming pools, as insects might be attracted to these areas. There are some species that prefer other foods such as fruits, but most of these are not usually found in the United States.

Bats can be either colonial bats, living in colonies, or solitary bats, living alone or with just a few other bats. There is no queen bat in colonies; the bats just aggregate together.

Bats emerge in the early days of spring and leave their overwintering sites for summer homes. Typically, the first to establish nesting areas are the females ready to give birth. Because of their impending maternity, these new colonies are known as maternity or nursery colonies.

Baby bats are usually born during the summer months. The infant bats breastfeed until they’re ready to fly and hunt food on their own. The bats remain in this roost until the fall when it’s time to overwinter. Prior to leaving for winter residence, males begin arriving at these colonies in large numbers, ready to mate with the female inhabitants.

Earwigs

Appearance 

There is a superstition that earwigs burrow into the ears of people while they sleep. This is a myth and without any scientific basis. Earwigs frighten many people because of the pincers on the back of their abdomens. Earwigs use these pincers for defense and for sparing with rival earwigs.There are more than twenty species of earwigs in the United States.

Depending on the species, adults range in size from 5-25 mm. They are slender insects with two pair of wings. Some species produce a foul smelling liquid that they use for defense. Earwigs also produce a pheromone (scent). Scientists believe that this pheromone is the reason that earwigs cluster together in large numbers. Immature earwigs (nymphs) resemble the adults except they do not have wings.

Centipedes

Centipedes belong to the class of Chilopoda. The name centipede, which means “100 legs,” can be somewhat misleading: centipedes may have anywhere from 15 to 177 pairs of legs.

Centipedes are elongated, with flat, segmented bodies that contain a pair of legs per segment. Centipedes occur in several colors and patterns but most common are brown and reddish orange. They range in size from 4 to 152 mm, depending on the species.

The heads of centipedes have a pair of long and sensitive antennae. They have small mouths and large, claw-like structures that contain a venom gland. Because most centipedes are carnivorous creatures that forage for food at night, they use their claws to paralyze their victims, such as worms, spiders and small vertebrates.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

 Adult centipedes hide in moist, dark and secluded areas during winter. They place eggs in dampened soil during summer or spring. As centipedes become adults, they grow a complete set of legs and extra segments. Most centipedes live for more than a year and some up to six years. Centipedes may enter houses and buildings, but they do not roam during daytime. They hide in damp areas around bathrooms, closets, basements and other sites typically infested by pests.

Centipedes detect prey through the use of their antennae, which are covered with dense hairs. Their prey is immobilized by venom injected from the maxilliped fang and held in place by the maxillipeds. Prey is passed to the mouth via the first and second maxillae and is then broken down by the mandibles. Most centipedes are carnivorous and prey upon soft-bodied insects, spiders, worms and other arthropods, including other centipedes.

Centipedes are not likely to consume wood. In actuality, arthropods commonly known as wood eating centipedes are millipedes. While millipedes do closely resemble centipedes, millipedes are herbivores and detritivores, subsisting on dead and decaying plant material, including wood or cellulose material.

Dragonflies

Appearance

Adult dragonflies have two pairs of wings. The back, or hind, wings are slightly larger at the base than the front wings. Dragonflies do not fold their wings when they land. Their wings extend from their body even when they are resting.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Dragonflies are predators throughout their life and consume a myriad of animals. On the menu are insects, including pests such as flies and mosquitoes. For this reason dragonflies are considered beneficial to man.

Reproduction

Adult dragonflies deposit their eggs in water or on aquatic plants. When the eggs hatch, the immature dragonflies, called naiads, live in the water. The naiads have gills in their abdomen so they can breathe underwater. They also use the gills for a form of “jet

propulsion” so they can move around in the water. Naiads eat mosquito larvae and other aquatic insects. Large naiads can even eat tadpoles and small fish.

Silverfish

Silver Fish is a small wingless insect which belongs to Animalia Kingdom. Commonly known as Paramites.

Silverfish are known for their destructive feeding habits. If you find any silverfish inside your home, spray the home’s perimeter with a residual insecticide.

How to get rid of this?

To get your pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

Silverfish infestations require professional treatment. Aarons Pest Control will send an expert who will be able to assess the situation within your home and determine the most effective methods of extermination for your specific problem. At the first sign of a silverfish

infestation, contact your local pest control professional. Scheduling a home inspection may help you get rid of silverfish.

 Behavior, Diet & Habits 

Capable of thriving in most climates, silverfish prefer to dwell in dark, damp areas such as basements, attics, kitchens and bathrooms. They are especially attracted to paper and damp clothing. Commonly found in stored boxes in garages and sheds.

Silverfish feed on carbohydrates, particularly sugars and starches. Cellulose, shampoos, glue in books, linen, silk and dead insects may be food sources. Have been found in unopened food packages.

Reproduction

Silverfish undergo love dances prior to mating. Males lay spermatophores, which are taken into the ovipositor of female specimens. Females’ egg numbers and habits vary, depending on species. One species lays a few eggs a day where as another species lays clusters of 2 to 20 eggs